The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then the Bigfoot

hit1During the end credits of this movie, when I saw the names Douglas Trumbull and Richard Yuricich come up on screen, I had such a strange sensation of nostalgia, of seeing old familiar friends after a long, long time. Which it has been, really- I don’t think I’ve seen both their names on a film’s credits since Brainstorm back in 1984. But it was such a surprise, as I had no idea either of them were connected with this film, especially as the film is such a low-key, odd little film that it seems the unlikeliest thing. But hey, life is full of surprises, and this was one of them. As far as film geeks go, it was like seeing the names of heroes onscreen, gave me something of a buzz. But hey, life is strange and film geeks stranger.

Its perhaps just as well that I really, really liked this film. I have since seen some really negative reviews and commentary about the film, but the hell with all that. We just like certain movies, and certain films click with certain people I guess. The title The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot may be its own problem, because I think that title suggests a certain kind of film; something trendy, funny, from left-field, like a Tarantino movie maybe, and this film is nothing at all like that. Instead The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot is a rather sad, melancholy fable, a story of an old man near the end of his life reflecting on his life, and his regrets.

It is also, oddly enough, something of a superhero film. Maybe an alternative superhero film, if there is such a thing. Because certainly the main character of this film, Calvin Barr (Sam Elliott) is a  man with superpowers. Its a film that approaches superheroes in a similar way that Watchmen did, asking ‘what would it be like if Superman existed in the Real World?’, and posits that he’d decide to live a quiet life away from any action, perhaps even regretting the heroic deeds he’d once done.Hmm, a Tarantino film it isn’t.

hit2So anyway, that’s pretty much what the film is about. Calvin is an old man, a recluse who unknown to anyone in his town was once a legendary assassin who killed Hitler, a success which failed to really change the course of WWII (turned out Germany used ‘fake’ Hitlers to continue a pretence that Hitler was alive in an attempt to maintain its war effort). So in the present-day, some MIB-type agents pull Calvin out of retirement for one final secret mission – to track down and kill a Bigfoot that is infected with a deadly disease that will likely infect and wipe out humanity if the creature remains on the loose much longer.

Its during these present-day sequences that Calvin reminisces about his past before the war, and his mission to kill Hitler during the war that changed everything for him. These flashbacks are intended to inform the present and why Calvin is the way he is- basically a bitter old man tired of living.  There is a bittersweet but doomed romance that suggests a life of happiness denied him- his price, perhaps, of his powers. Regards these powers, they are fairly mundane- he can’t fly or anything- instead he is very strong, deadly in combat, adept at any languages (hence a useful talent undercover during the war in occupied territory) and immune to any disease (its likely, for instance, he’s never had a cold in all his life). Likely he has other talents/powers the film doesn’t show. During flashbacks to the war, we see him witness Jews being put on trains to the concentration camps, and I think his powerlessness to stop it -and his later assassination of Hitler failing to really alter anything- makes him feel a failure, as if he wasted his talents.

Its as if being born a comparative Superman, but then failing to really achieve anything, made him feel he has had a wasted life. Perhaps his life of anonymity was the price for maintaining some normality, avoiding the circus of notoriety in the public eye. I guess you either buy into that or not, but its an interesting premise.

hit4Sam Elliott as the grizzled, weary old Calvin is perfect for the role- its like it was written for him, and Aidan Turner (yeah that Poldark fella) does pretty fine as the young Calvin. I thought it was a really interesting, and quite affecting film, graced with a notable score from Joe Kraemer that evokes all kinds of John Williams textures. Indeed in many ways it feels a film from some other time- a film very of the 1970s, with its slow pace and gentle feel. Even the Bigfoot sequences (man in a suit! man in a suit!) brings to mind guilty pleasures like Kolchak: The Night Stalker. Okay, Bigfoot is really a little more sophisticated than that really sounds, but you know, its certainly no modern CGI extravaganza, and that’s part of the films charm.

So anyway, I really enjoyed it and was quite surprised by the negative reviews I’ve since read. Then again, its just one of those films that perhaps defy ordinary expectations, especially with the hook that the title suggests. Its really something of a gentle fable of what a life with superpowers might be like. The fact its not a life with capes and masks and super-villains likely confounds some. I thought it refreshing. And hey, its a film with the names Douglas Trumbull and Richard Yuricich on the end credits. I’m still getting a kick out of that.

4 thoughts on “The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then the Bigfoot

  1. Tom

    Very cool to see the different things you’ve taken away from this movie. I really enjoyed this too, it’s so off-beat and melancholic I found myself engrossed pretty much from minute one. I was drawn to the idea of violence never doing anything for this guy. All it’s done is left him alone, a called-upon weapon, a tool used by the government and dispensed of, in a way, when finished. It’s a fascinating fable that definitely has ejected a lot of viewers due to that catchy title. But at the same time, the movie does EXACTLY as the label says.

    1. Glad you enjoyed it too mate. It seems to have been a rather misunderstood film. Its one of the best films I have seen this year, I think. Sam Elliott really nailed Calvin’s sense of loneliness. There was a sadness to him, he was so convinced, I think, that killing anyone at all was a sin. I actually wondered if I’d missed something regards a religious upbringing. He was almost distraught at the Bigfoot being the last of its kind, perhaps he recognised it as a kindred spirit, as alone as he felt he was. Its one film I really want to watch again, see if it works the same on second viewing.

  2. Well, this is unexpected! I’ve got the film on my ‘to watch’ list, but only because I assumed it was a Snakes on a Plane-type deal — a catchy title masking a mediocre/bad film, but hopefully with enough pulpy entertainment value to be worth a couple of hours. Sounds like it’s something considerably more interesting.

  3. Pingback: The 2019 List: October – the ghost of 82

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