Halloween (2018)

hall1.jpgHalloween 2018 starts out really well. Its central conceit is that none of the myriad Halloween sequels/remakes/spin-offs or reboots ever happened, and that, 40 years later, this is the Part Two to the 1978 original’s Part One. A little like how the aborted Alien 5 would have pretended that Alien 3 & Alien: Resurrection never existed. In a similar way to films like Creed and BR2049, it treats the original material and mythology with some reverence and sincerity. It also allows, as the other films did, for the intervening years in the real world to be reflected by the passage of time in the movie world, adding some weight of pathos to the proceedings, allowing that sense of the weight of time for the characters to be shared by viewers. Maybe it just makes the nostalgia and recollection of the original feel more intense, and maybe it transfers those feelings to the new incarnation.

Of course, the central issue for Halloween 2018 is that its taking something that’s inherently very simple (the 1978 film is basically just a b-movie slasher/exploitation horror flick that has been endlessly copied ever since) and treating it very, very seriously. I’m a big fan of the original- John Carpenter was (is?) a consummate horror director with a keen eye for composition and skill in the editing room at maintaining tension and jumps and scares, but really, Halloween 1978 is not High Art, although it’s surely a classic of a genre not particularly renowned for high quality. Its simplicity is likely the key to its effectiveness and how well it has stood the test of time- and of course there is the brooding, relentless electronic score.

That score returns (and John Carpenter, on scoring duties here, with it), and it really helps Halloween 2018 feel authentic, in just the same way as BR2049 felt like a Blade Runner movie.  Something’s a little off though, with Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) not quite ringing true as she goes all Sarah Connor from T2, ready and waiting for Michael Myers to inevitably escape from his incarceration and run amok on another killing spree. This time she’s spent decades survivalist training and building Fortress Strode out in the woods into a safehouse for when Myers comes knocking. And of course, he does, complete with his iconic Captain Kirk mask, conveniently brought along by dim-witted journalists looking for a great story and getting undone by it, the mask apparently the trigger for The Shape to do what he does best on another Halloween night. There’s lots of graphic deaths and grisly gore here, a marked difference to the surprising restraint and suggestion which Carpenter crafted in the original- perhaps the most disturbing sign of just how much times have changed.

It seems churlish of me, really, to criticise this film as it was surprisingly sincere and effective in approach and how it was made, and the cast are great, the jumps are pretty great and the violence certainly made me wince- it works so well in so many ways. But I just didn’t buy Laurie going all Sarah Connor. It just makes it feel like a different, ‘wrong’ movie, like when James Cameron spun his Rambo-in-space yarn from Alien‘s ‘ten little indians’ horror film. Suddenly the tables are turned and the hunter becomes the hunted, and a crazy woman having an arsenal in her basement something to be applauded. Infact, thank God for that, because the doctors are crazier than Myers (I so sorely missed the great Donald Pleasence, whose presence seems to haunt the film like a vacant void) and the cops are more stupid and ineffective than ever. I suppose there’s a kind of movie myth that the world needs heroes like Sarah Connor rather than the original 1978 films nice girl next door; gun-toting heroines rather than terrified babysitters just trying to survive. I quite liked the post-traumatic, dysfunctional and rather unhinged Laurie that we first see in the film, but got rather bored by the killing machine survivalist she turns out to really be. Maybe the film is some kind of commentary on violence breeding violence and Myer’s bloody violence transforming 1978s nice girl next door babysitter into, well, another killer.  Maybe I’m just missing something.

3 thoughts on “Halloween (2018)

  1. Matthew McKinnon

    I have to agree, the last act didn’t really work. It felt mechanical and forced. Especially since the first two-thirds of the film offered such pleasing incidental pleasures: the supporting characters, the dialogue, the feeling of a living breathing small town. And then suddenly we’re in slightly grinding action-movie mode.

    I might actually have enjoyed this more than the original, though – sacrilege to say it out loud, I’m sure. I’ve never quite gotten Halloween: slashers don’t scare me [the supernatural does, so Nightmare On Elm Street had a much bigger effect one me back then].

    And though the technique is very fine indeed, the subject matter of Halloween is just a bit… dull. It’s definitely the least interesting of Carpenter’s golden streak. I even prefer Halloween III, to be honest, for the Nigel Kneale element.

    1. Oh yeah, Halloween III is pretty cool, although I haven’t had chance to see it years. I obsessed over that film’s soundtrack for so long (hmm, I’ll have to go dig that CD out again), it was one of Carpenter & Howarth’s strongest scores. I agree Halloween isn’t one of Carpenter’s strongest films, even though its possibly only second to The Thing in general popularity- of his early films, I always preferred Assault, or EFNY.

      Carpenter was a fantastic director but not the best writer- I think had he had better material he could have had much better success in the mainstream, but at heart he was always anti-authority, indie at heart and just couldn’t thrive in the studio system. Such a shame. His films were just perfect for the home video era though.

  2. Pingback: The 2019 List: May – the ghost of 82

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