Ready Player One (2018)

The problem with Ready Player One is that it is, essentially, four different stories, and the film-makers concentrated on the wrong one.

rp1aStory one: Its 2045, and its a dystopian world of economic collapse and (presumably) environmental disaster. People seem to be mostly poor and living in over-crowded shanty-towns, and unemployed. Everyone -and I mean, seemingly everyone– seems to spend their waking hours in a virtual world called The Oasis. Reality is so desperately depressing that escape is everything, even if its only virtual. But that, pretty much, is all we know about 2045. We don’t know any details of the social-political climate, who’s in charge, who’s paying the bills. The company behind The Oasis is the richest on the planet, worth trillions, but its not clear how it makes any money, because The Oasis seems to be free. The film doesn’t not examine why everyone feels the need to escape into a virtual world or how that might mirror our own current preoccupation with our ‘escapes’ be it films or television or video games. We see nothing of any counter-culture that might perceive The Oasis as a threat or blight on society and the world, or if humanity escaping to this virtual haven means it has given up on reality and we are all doomed. The Oasis is there, and everybody’s playing it- that is the world of 2045.

rp1bStory two-  genius recluse James Halliday (Mark Rylance), in the mid 2020’s creates a virtual world, The Oasis, that in a bleak and downward-spiraling world becomes a bright haven for a desperate humanity. Halliday was a solitary child who grew up a secluded life in the 1980s and whose only comfort was predominantly the 80’s pop-culture of that decade, and so The Oasis is dominated by that culture. Somehow this obsession seduces everyone who experiences The Oasis. It becomes a 1980s Heaven.

READY PLAYER ONEBut Halliday, although the richest man on Earth at this point, is deeply unhappy, sinking into morose regret for what he considers is his biggest mistake- not having the courage to have a relationship with the one love of his life- KIra, who ended up marrying his one-time business colleague, Ogden Morrow (Simon Pegg). His obsession in creating a virtual world seems to have stopped him from living properly in the real world, and he only realizes in his old age that reality is better than virtuality. Perhaps it finally dawns on him that his invention overtaking the world is detrimental, humanity obsessed by his virtual world and not dealing with reality’s problems. But instead of shutting down The Oasis or sharing his wisdom, he instead creates a magic virtual quest to find an Easter Egg hidden within The Oasis, involving three magic keys and clues and riddles that er, might do something like making someone fabulously rich. The he dies.

rp1d.pngStory three- Nolan Sorrento during the mid-2020s works as a lab/office assistant to Halliday and Morrow at Gregarious Games, the company that makes The Oasis. A lowly assistant who fetches the coffee, somehow this downtrodden rat becomes the CEO of Innovative Online Industries (IOI), the second biggest company in the world and rival to Gregarious Games, as if his whole life has been one hellbent on revenge over his old bosses who didn’t care for his coffee. Seriously, his rise through the ranks to lead a rival company sounds a better story than anything else in Ready Player One. I want to see how he did it, because he’s patently a jerk and an idiot, but at least it’d be interesting to see the snake on his corporate climb and see the trail of misery in his wake.

rp1eStory four- uber-geek dead-end orphan Wade Watts spends all his time in The Oasis, his virtual alter-ego Parzifal trying to decipher the clues/riddles that will lead to the keys to Halliday’s fabled Easter Egg. He befriends Art3mis, a beautiful girl-avatar who fortunately is also a  girl in the real-world (and hey, incredibly pretty too although she doesn’t think so and she secretly seeks self-validation and the love of a good guy so you can guess where that goes) but she is also cool at videogames etc and together with his own group of teenage virtual super-heroes they go on a great adventure in The Oasis and try to thwart the attempts of IOI to secure the Egg and control of The Oasis for its own nefarious corporate ends. BIt like Harry Potter for videogame geeks.

So they went with story four and shoved the rest into dull exposition/skimpy background details. Maybe they went with the right choice. It looks pretty.

The thing is, all the attention seems to be on The Oasis and its spectacular CGI effects and all the nods to pop-culture references (there’s Robocop! look there’s Valley Forge from Silent Running! Look there’s a pod from 2001 hiding in the background! He’s driving a goddam Delorean! etc etc) and its really very boring surprisingly quickly. And as you might expect, its so full of crazy shit being thrown on-screen its hard most of the time to tell whats going on. I was surprised because I thought Spielberg would have demonstrated more control and keyed things back, but he seems too enamored of his CGI toys that he gets quite carried away. Bit like how Pete Jackson lost his shit on The Hobbit films.

Meanwhile in the real world there’s possibly a more interesting story or stories to tell but this isn’t that movie. This is Tron x100 (even though, ironically,I can’t recall an actual Tron reference, funnily enough) full of cartoony extravaganzas that made me yearn, funnily enough, for the Matrix films.

So its not a bad film. Its just pretty dumb. But I guess its just that kind of dumb spectacular blockbuster entertainment with one-dimensional characters and simple plot-lines and a comfortably-predictable story. But this is Spielberg. He made Minority Report, Close Encounters, Jaws, Raiders of the Lost Ark– as far as pop-culture/ sci-fi/fantasy movies he’s much better than this. Maybe I should cut this film some slack instead of it bugging me for what it isn’t.

But deep down, I wish Joe Dante had made this movie. My God it would have been bloody incredible, I’m sure. Crazy, irreverent, clever. Everything that this film really isn’t, unfortunately.

(But it looks nice).

6 thoughts on “Ready Player One (2018)

  1. Matthew McKinnon

    Hmmm.
    Well, maybe when it hits Netflix, and over the course of two or three lunchtimes when I’m working at home.
    Maybe.

    1. Well, it was everything I expected, I guess. What I didn’t mention in the review was The Shining sequence, in which our virtual heroes enter the Overlook Hotel and experience its ‘highlights’. Its a brilliant recreation of the sets and some of the sequences. I’m not certain how it was done exactly, part-sets and part digital recreations using high-quality samples from a pristine print, I gather, but its gob-smacking stuff which unfortunately degenerates into a zombie dance in the grand dance hall, but it hints at something the film could have done more of while highlighting its limitations.

      We’ve had virtual/CGI characters in films now but virtual recreations of film spaces themselves is a new one on me. Surprised Spielberg didn’t take us onboard the Discovery- that would have been something…

  2. I didn’t get a chance to watch this on Monday after all, and I’m currently away from home for a couple of weeks, so it’ll have to wait until I’m back now — as shall reading this review in full. I’ve seen reactions to the film every which way from “instant classic” down to “irredeemable crap” though, so, hey, at least you didn’t hate it!

  3. Just finished watching it. Very fair review. I enjoyed it as a piece of fluff, and it’s fun spotting some of the references (there are so many I think “spotting some” is the only thing possible; and, really, it’s just that they featured Serenity fairly prominently and that made inordinately happy), but it doesn’t hang together as a plausible story because the real world makes no sense.

    One thing that did amuse me: it’s been hailed by gamers as such a great depiction of video game culture, yet the final message is very clearly “go spend more time in the real world!”

    1. Regards that ‘message’, yeah, its very confused. I’ve tried rewatching the film but I’ve given up after twenty minutes, I’ve found all the empty-headed optimism and CGI excess just turns me off. Maybe Spielberg was just the wrong director for it, or maybe he’s missing the John Williams magic (Silvestri’s score is ok, but its telling to see a film by Spielberg so ‘blockbuster’ in nature missing William’s touch- its like Spielberg has an arm tied behind his back, and perhaps indicates how much he needs Willlams music in some of his films). The two really are a double-act

      There’s also far too much time spent in the virtual world for my liking, and its far too much a cartoon. Not that the real-world really convinces either. Possibly the biggest disappointment of the year for me. And yes, I guess that includes TLJ so that says something.

  4. Pingback: Ready Player One (2018) | 100 Films in a Year

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